About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
regulation. >> what impact, if any, do you think that the changes in california and their method for electing congressional representatives will have? >> are you referring to the redistricting? >> yes. democrat versus democrat, republican versus republican in their system of electing. >> if i am understanding your right, you are referring to -- now there was a kind of bipartisan commission that redesigned -- that did the redistricting. now, i actually did a story for the atlantic monthly on redistricting. i had mentioned this thing. there has been -- the belief by many politicians is that there is no such thing as a bipartisan board are nonpartisan board. they often times point to the california commission as a failed experiment because the democrats had menace to influence a series of e-mails obtained by pro public of which suggest that was the minister and floods a lot of these. having said that there are a number of other states in the u.s. that do have bipartisan redistricting commissions. and just for what it's worth another reason why this is a salient topic is that i am often asked, if
, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of the period of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from the state on the sun belt. when johnson from texas, richard nixon from california. gerald ford was never elected, so he doesn't count. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california. the first george bush via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second question texas. so too does the natives and so ways a watershed election. it ends the 40 year. the sun belt dominance. their issues critical in the politics that developed that came out of the sun belt. they didn't have a conservative cast of them. they tended to be oriented about issues of strong national defense, and opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also is in the south and sou
of california. this will be cosponsored by the english department and the african-american studies department. and we are acknowledged their generosity for bringing up to this historical room. that everybody would be able to find it. it's like a landmark. the great poets of the road, great of the world. we want to welcome richard hudson, professor to preaching on behalf of this department. he was professor emeritus and a member of the affiliated faculty of the american studies program and interdisciplinary program that was key founder 25 years ago. he came to you see berkeley's english department in 1964 and retired in 2009. although he's continued teaching until this summer. his special interest has been american cultural history, especially from the civil war to world war one. he's now president of the western literature association will host 300 to 400 people in berkeley at the annual conference in october of 2013 and practices good luck with that. [laughter] >> i basically just want to say a word. you happen to be in the jewel room of an edge department. this department has, unlike other
town meetings and apples. we can of oranges in some other process in california to people can take the inspiration and use it from wherever they are to the democratic possibility rises up locally and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. >> and 73 from the historical society. if a sub for a librarian and were in the vault of history center in vermont. we've got a photo album created by george houghton, a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of burbach troops are in civil war. he presented this album to us in 1863 after he returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters that camp, but also other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that often reproduced as this one of a family of slaves again tieless. right below it is a photograph of soffa vermont officers. >> some of the other pictures showed been batteries they were using that were involved in this. there are photos here show in the aftermath at the burial ground of the soldiers. those photos get used a lot. there's a batter
for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't know the future and i will stick with john adams it's rare to last forever and i went to try to make it that way. [applause] >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the ameri
where stanford california is and i went to berkeley to get away from stanford. i study political theory and then i was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant why was a student, robert, who at that time, he brought in and worked there for a while. i guess the rest is in history but anyway, that's a bit of early backer spent and i want to get in this comment from jill. jill tweets in, what influence do you think mr. hitchens writing had on shaping women's history in america and the world? >> i'm not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously a bloke i have a new. he was absolutely, he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote a piece for "vanity fair," why women aren't funny. at it was one more assignment and he wrote it. and if you actually read it, it doesn't actually, the article doesn't say what the title might imply. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man, and so loved by women. he was very charismatic. women adored him, but he didn't let the sexual card at all. so i don't know what, i don't know if he has a place in quote women's hi
bookstores in america like cody's bookstore in berkeley, california, was firebombed. at a bookstore in london that was firebombed toys. bookstores all over the world that were attacked, not just burn but actually people going into bookstores and threatening people working there. and in publishing companies and then, well, the great tragedy was the books, the japanese translator, was murdered at his university in japan. and there was intent to murder and norwegian publisher and the italian translator of the book, for both fortunately survived. but this was a shooting war. and the point is that in all these cases, the evidence that emerged showed that these were professional hits. >> this was not spontaneous. >> no, no. these were professional hits. and so basically the danger was very high. until this moment in around the turn-of-the-century, when we finally managed to get the iranians to back down. and at the point at which we are convinced certain that the action had stood down these gangs of killers, really most of the danger went away. >> dr. hatchett and to this next question. what is the
stanford, california is. went to berkeley to get away from stanford. a state political theory. now was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant well was a student. the rest is history. >> of want to give him this comment. what influence to you think mr. hichens writing hand along with shaping women's history? >> i am not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously. he was absolutely -- he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote that piece for vanity fair. you know, it was one more assignment command eroded. if you actually read it does not -- the article does not say what the title might imply. yes. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man in so loved by women. very charismatic. women adored him. he did not play the sexual cardinal. i don't know if he has a place in women's history perce, but just in the liberation of all groups. he would definitely have thought that the better law made sense. he would never think a woman should make less than a man. think maybe there is just -- that's it. i have nothing to say more. >> just a couple
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8